GMO Labeling Bill Heading to White House

Washington, D.C. – This afternoon, the House passed the GMO labeling agreement designed by Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts and Ranking Member Debbie Stabenow, by a vote of 306 to 117. The Senate passed the bill last Thursday by a vote of 63 to 30, advancing the agreement on to the House this week, and now the bill will be on the President’s desk to sign into law.

In 2014, President Obama wrote to Julie Borlaug, granddaughter of the Nobel Peace Prize recipient and notable wheat researcher Norman Borlaug, publicly stating his support for biotechnology and his belief, shared with Norman Borlaug, that biotech will be part of a solution to the planet’s agricultural programs. NAWG encourages President Obama to stand by the statement by signing this important bill into law and creating real progress in achieving public acceptance of biotechnology.

This bill is a crucial step forward in informing customers about a safe and sustainable technology to ensure access to affordable food for consumers. The labeling options allowed in this law will encourage public acceptance of this reliable technology, while preempting the state-by-state patchwork that Vermont’s law alongside other potential future state laws could cause. This technology, which has been proven safe for human consumption, is one of the most reliable ways forward in assuring global food security and access to sustainably-produced food.

“We applaud the House’s action in clearing this bill and sending it to President Obama,” said NAWG President Gordon Stoner. “We urge him to see that this bill will inform consumers about the technologies which make their food safe and affordable, and we hope that he will sign it immediately. It is crucial that American consumers receive clear and simple information about their food, so that they will see the benefit of these technologies that supply safe, sustainably-produced food.”

NAWG supports the House’s passing of this bill, and strongly urges President Obama to sign the bill into law as soon as possible.